Wednesday, 26 October 2011

Heybridge Basin,Essex

On a dreary overcast day in July we decided to drive 45 minutes up the coast from home to Heybridge Basin.
You might like to accompany us on our walk







passing a roadway to the left as we continue along the creek which is on our right




We have now reached the mouth of the river which flows out into various creeks, skirting around some small islands before flowing into the North Sea.


A lock to the right


and The Old Ship Inn to the left



We arrive at The Lock tearooms where we sit outside and have lunch


Wilkin & Sons is an old family run jam and preserve company in Tiptree (that I have posted on in the past) that is not too far away


Opposite one sees The Jolly Sailor Inn 


Looking across from the other side of the creek


I hope you enjoyed your walk, as we did, even though the sun did not shine
On our way here we visited The Museum of Power
and from here we visited Maldon on the other side of the creek
photos in a future post 

16 comments:

HOPE said...

Wonderful...I love all the adventures you share...Love the quaint inns and styles of buildings...

Thank you...I bet you enjoyed Tea Time!!

Blessings
HOPE

Needled Mom said...

What a charming walk we had! I did miss that warm sun, but it was beautiful anyway. Someday I want to REALLY walk on all of your shared visits!!!!!

Bernideen said...

Yes, I very much enjoyed my visit here! Wonderful!

Lorrie said...

Seaside villages look much the same round the world, yet each has their own flavour, too. Even though the sun didn't shine for you, you had a lovely day, and that's what matters most.

loveithandmade said...

The clouds did not dampen the walk for me....it was great!

Willow said...

What an interesting spot. I love the names of the inns. Essex is truly a beautiful area.

Scriptor Senex said...

My daughter bought me some Tiptree jam and preserves once. Now I know where they came from.

The lapboard houses (is that the right expression for the wooden faced houses?) reminded me how many different styles we have in Britain. Wooden houses are something that you just don't see here in North-west England but they are becoming popular in the Outer Hebrides because you can buy the modern ones in kit form and ship them over ready to erect.

C. Joy said...

What a great walk. We've got rain in our forecast today, so I'm about to get out and have a walk around the neighborhood - no pictures will follow. I'm curious, do those shops and houses ever flood? They look so close to the water. Also, I'm familiar with the Wilkin & Sons jams - my favorite is one that is made especially for Christmas (got it as a gift a few years back and now I'm first in line for it every November at "British Emporium" - a shop in Grapevine, TX). It's always fun to read your posts.

elizabeth said...

Love to see all the old Essex cottages.

Terri said...

I do love our walks with you, but I don't seem to get any exercise this way... funny that! I should take pics on a walk of my own... ya, ya!
Hugs

Anne said...

Beautiful photos! Thanks for taking me on a walk with you. :-)
Blessings,

Trisha said...

Sure could use some of that July sunshine and beautiful scenery right now. It is a cold rainy day in Southern Kentucky. Blessings Barbara, have a great weekend.

Sara Lorayne said...

Coastal towns always feel like "home" to me...though they look very different there from what I am used to here. Thank you for the walk...wish I had been there for real!

Kay G. said...

Thank you for this walk. If it had been sunny, you would not have enjoyed the beautiful clouds!
Oh, and the Wilkin & Sons Jams are so wonderful! Silly to be so excited when I recognized the sign...

Pomona said...

It looks like a really lovely place to go and walk - in spite of the clouds!

Pomona x

KarenMaggie said...

What an interesting spot you chose to go to. Absolutely charming, and such a contrast to where I live between the Utah mountains and the southwest desert. I'm always fascinated with quaint villages and anything near the water. Lucky you!