Sunday, 19 October 2008

Clandon Park and Hatchlands Park

We are going on 2 visits in one post here. Clandon and Hatchlands are very close to each other. We have just come from having lunch at Polesden Lacey and the weather has improved.

Clandon House was used in the film "Duchess" which is currently at the cinema. Film makers use many different houses when making one film sometimes. They may use the gardens of one house and the building of another, or select rooms from different houses. In the making of Duchess several locations were used and here they used the magnificent Marble Hall at Clandon. It's beautiful and I wish I could show you.One of those halls where you can look down over the balustrades from above and see the hall in all it's splendour.

Clandon is a grand 18th century Palladian mansion. Built in 1730 for the 2nd Lord Onslow by the Venetian architect Giacomo Leoni, Clandon's interior is the most complete example of his work to survive and is notable for it's magnificent, two-storey white Marble Hall. The Onslow family are unique in providing 3 Speakers of the House of Commons from one family.The house is filled with a superb collection of 18th century furniture, porcelain and textiles.

The side of the house where restoration to the exterior is taking place

The back with the parterre gardens






The Grotto










A Maori Meeting House, one of only four outside New Zealand, brought back in 1892 by the 4th Earl of Onslow who was Governor there.



The Stable block




We now arrive at Hatchlands


Hatchlands is an 18th century mansion with Adam interiors and a large collection of keyboard instruments. Built in the 1750's for Admiral Boscowan, hero of the Battle of Louisburg, the house contains the earliest recorded decorations in an English country house by Robert Adam - whose ceilings here appropriately feature nautical motives.
On display is the Cobbe Collection, the world's largest group of keyboard instruments, many associated with famous composers such as Purcell, J.C. Bach, Chopin, Mahler and Elgar. The house is set in beautiful woodlands and open parkland.










16 comments:

Sara said...

Oh, we just saw "Duchess" last week! I enjoyed it; the homes were, of course, magnificent. If anyone is interested, I recommend reading the book first. You learn a lot more about her from the book than the movie, as one might expect.

Vee ~ A Haven for Vee said...

There must be so many master gardeners in Britain. I've never seen such immaculate landscapes. Do you know that one that I clicked on immediately, though? The little path through the trees...love that photo!

Yes, I'm very chatty lately, Barbara. Sorry 'bout that! :D

willow said...

Wonderful pix and interesting post, as always, Barbara. I need to see "Duchess"!!

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

Well I must see the Duchess now! I have been gone this week and am now catching up on all your lovely travel photos! What a treat! Such beautiful things to see here, as always!

Nana Trish is Living the Dream said...

Barb, you get to see so many wonderful places. I especially loved the Maori meeting house. It seems like I always gravitate to the smaller places. I guess I always think about heating, cooling, cleaning the big mansions. I will read the book first before seeing the movie Duchess. Do you keep albums of your visits? You have such a grand collection of pictures.

The Summer Kitchen Interiors said...

Goodness! Are these beautiful homes and gardens! Now we are looking forward to seeing Duchess - to get the "sneak peek" inside!!
Thanks for stopping by the other day! We were pleased to have you over!
Karla & Karrie

Wild Rose said...

I already planned to see the Duchess ~ all I need is the time!

Lovely photos Barbara.

Marie x

Mike said...

I've been to both of those! But I had no idea that Clandon was in The Duchess, I didn't recognise it. Thanks.

Kristen said...

beautiful as always! Having live in desert countries as a child and even now to a degree, I never take greenery for granted. does it sound strange to say that seen green is refreshing to the soul? for me anyways...

Sharon said...

Perfectly lovely Barbara!Blessings~Sharon G.

Linda said...

I'll have to see that movie. The house is sure incredible.

Cousin Pam said...

Have just caught up with all your blogs since our holiday in Wiltshire. We really are blessed with so many wonderful stately homes and gardens to visit. The autumnal colours are so beautiful. I love your new header - what an explosion of colour!
By the way, I checked out the text of your blog on Saturday, 11th October and it's called "Breaking the Chains" by Jakob Boehme (1575-1624). He was known as the 'Tuetonic Theosopher' and was a simple German Lutheran, who practised the trade of shoemaking throughout much of his life. HIs mystical insights, often couched in Hermetic and alchemical language, were written down in such treatises as Aurora, The Way to Christ & The Signature of All Things. This particular reading is taken from his Dialogue of the Supersensual Life. It's amazing what you can find on the web!!

Needled Mom said...

I always enjoy your photos, Barbara. You should put them all together in a big book so everyone could see all the beauty that you have discovered. Your love of history and photography shines through your work.

Willow said...

I agree with Needled Mom--you should do up a book of photos!

Barbara said...

The Duchess is just on here. I wonder whether I'll recognize some of your pictures there... Thank you for this information and the interesting pictures.

Melanie said...

Lovely pictures. I like the neatness of partierre gardens. Those stables look like they would be very roomy loose boxes.

Thanks for taking me along.